10 Oct

Have you taken notice to the pleasure and the strain in writing words? To me, the pleasure to connect in the deepest part of your soul with another seems like the closest thing to God. And it’s so important to be clear when choosing words so that others can understand what we feel.

Writing a book and blogging have become within reach of most everyone these days. But as an author, I confess that I hesitate to publish even a modest comment without an echo of reference from scripture or from a saintly teacher who points to the same path. And it’s no coincidence how quickly the perfect scripture or quote appears to support whatever point I’m trying to make!

Only then am I comforted that this inspiration is from God and not my ego, and I feel more confident as I write. You may feel this way, too. I just love Pope Francis telling participants at the opening Synod “Speak frankly. Listen humbly.” I find his words most powerful and encouraging, and I hope to put them into practice as I write.

Writing is giving a word a thought to live in, or a thought for a word to live in while we search for the perfect words that bless, help, and prosper one another. Whether the reader is looking for love, adventure, history, politics, education, creativity, inspiration, healing, health, or simply to connect with someone else, a writer’s words can be the closest thing to God for those who read them. Those words help the reader to understand themselves from another’s creative experiences and ideals. We all want to know the words that God would have us write through inspiration. And we all have to look at the whole (holy) picture before we jot them down without proper consideration and care.

At times, it may feel somewhat of a strain when our smaller selves don’t want to give up the familiar words we’re used to choosing; regardless of whether they’re the best choice. Nonetheless, they have been the pictures in our minds and those words, thoughts, and feelings have become the truths in our lives. It’s not until the sacred whisper replaces those thoughts and ideas that have not blessed, healed, helped, or prospered us that the writer recognizes and re-write the words that we can understand on a deeper level. Only then will we see something larger and greater that makes all the difference in our lives. Only then are we reborn to the greater passion that ignites beautiful and loving words that speak in our hearts. That is when we begin to thrive in blessings and prosperity and be consoled and joined together through prayer.

“Our thoughts and plans will correspond to God’s dream: to form a holy people who are his own and produce the fruits of the kingdom of God.” (Matthew 21:43)

About Catherine Nagle: Catherine grew up in Philadelphia with 16 brothers and sisters, reared by loving, old school Italian parents. Catherine’s artist father’s
works graced locations from churches to public buildings; her mother was a full-time homemaker. A professional hairdresser, Catherine worked in various salons while studying the Bible and pursuing spiritual growth through courses, seminars, lectures and inspirational books, including A Course in Miracles and the works of Marianne Williamson among many others. The mother of two children and a grandmother, Catherine lives in Pennsylvania with her husband and son. She is the Author of Imprinted Wisdom.


About the Author

Written by Catherine Nagle

Catherine grew up in Philadelphia with 16 brothers and sisters, reared by loving, old-school Italian parents. Catherine's artist father's works graced churches and public buildings; her mother was a full-time homemaker. A professional hairdresser, Catherine worked in various salons while studying the Bible and pursuing spiritual growth through courses, seminars, lectures, works of Marianne Williamson, and conferences, including the National Theology of the Body Congress. She is also an Ambassador of the Society of Emotional Intelligence. The mother of two children and now a grandmother, Catherine lives in Pennsylvania with her husband and son. She is the Author of Imprinted Wisdom and a contributor to Anne Born’s These Winter Months: The Late Orphan Project Anthology.


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